Common Drywall Installation Mistakes

Drywall Repairs

Even if you have all of the right drywall supplies at your disposal, it’s still possible to mess up. Installation is not as easy as repair. In many instances it’s preferable to call a professional to do the installation for you. However, if you still want to do it yourself, you need to be aware of common mistakes that many other DIYers have made.

If you can avoid these mistakes, you stand a better chance of installing drywall correctly:

Inadequate framing

The framing at the inside corners is often lacking, making it impossible to fasten the edge of the drywall. To prevent this problem, inspect the framing before you begin to hang the drywall. There should be at least one inch of exposed framing at the corners. If there is not, add an additional 2x4 alongside the framing.

Not marking the framing locations

Failing to mark the precise location of the framing members before covering them with drywall, you might not place the screws in accurately. The location of the ceiling joists on the top wall framing plate should also be marked, as well as the center of each stud on the floor. After hanging the ceiling drywall, mark the stud locations on the ceiling before installing the drywall on the walls. Marking everything makes the installation a whole lot easier.

Creating extra joints

Taping drywall takes up enough time as it is. Adding unnecessary joints makes the job a lot more difficult than it needs to be. The idea is to use the largest and longest sheets possible. Don’t worry about using too much material, drywall is pretty inexpensive. If the walls you are working on are between 8’1” and 9’1”, you might want to order special 54-inch wide sheets of drywall material to avoid creating an extra horizontal joint.

Trying to cut for a tight fit.

You don’t need to measure and cut drywall in hopes of an exact fit. It’ll probably just cause unnecessary trouble. Instead of taking a risk and jamming in a piece that is too tight, just go with a loose fit. Too tight of a fit will cause the drywall to crumble along the edge. Ideally, cut the drywall to leave a 1/8-inch gap at the edges.

Trying to install tapered edges along outside corners.

Don’t hang a sheet of drywall with its tapered edge along corners. Doing this will make it difficult for you to install the corner of the bead accurately, as it will hang too long, making it hard to cover with joint compound. To prevent this, simply place cut edges instead of tapered edges along outside corners.

Inadequate insulation and ventilation

Before you even begin on a drywall project, you MUST have the insulation, moisture control, wiring, plumbing, ventilation, and utilities inspected. You don’t want to risk going against local codes.

Shoving the drywall over an outlet box

There is always the possibility of having an outlet hole that doesn’t fit properly. Many people make the mistake of screwing drywall to the framing before trying to trim the opening. This could cause the drywall to break around the electrical box, and will require extra time and money to patch. To prevent this mistake, check the fit BEFORE trying to press the drywall tightly to the wall around the outlet box.

If you’re unsure whether you’ll be able to do the installation without making a mistake, call a drywall company and ask for help. A single mistake can hold you back and cost you extra money.

 

 

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